Why Do Humans Trust Each Other?

8 management behaviors that foster trust.
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The Neuroscience of Trust

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During his research, Paul Z. Jak, found that building a culture of trust is what makes a meaningful difference. Employees in high-trust organizations are more productive, have more energy at work, collaborate better with their colleagues, and stay with their employers longer than people working at low-trust companies. While leaders can't argue that cultures of trust have many benefits for business, leaders often don't know where or how to start. Jak's neuroscience experiments reveal eight ways that leaders can effectively create and manage a culture of trust. He describes those strategies in the article below, including the science behind his framework.

The Neuroscience of Trust

In Brief The Problem Leaders know that low employee engagement is a sign of lost value-it's clearly something they want to fix. But most of them don't know how, so they provide random perks, hoping those will move the needle. The Solution It's much more effective to create a culture of trust.

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